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's overwhelming popularity of latino men and women. and i don't include this on the table, but there is a gender gap among the 10 catholics. the two men are less likely to support obama and women but generally speaking the vast majority of latino men are supporting obama. what's driving this is immigration. for latino voters the economy was the first issue most important, but immigration was a close second. roughly one in for latino voters said in the state immigration was their major reason for going to the poll. you can see how that is going to be benefiting barack obama in this election. interestingly while why catholics are more likely to vote for romney overall. they're still a gender gap. respect to the views on abortion, health and human services birth control method, religious freedom and the culture of dependency, it appears the bishops vocal opposition to the health and human services mandate is not something most dashing most catholics from supporting. at least when supplied to catholic hospital or universities. only a slight minority of catholic women and men support the health and h
and the way in which latino catholics catholics are more likely to support the democratic candidate -- it will not be as good as from deducter in future election as it has been in the past as a bellwether. one of the things that we've focused on the election season is how the catholics vote is important how it can be seen a bell bellwether or swing vote. in between the different religious groups here. these are from exit polls from recent election. you can see, it's a percentage of the groups that are supporting the democratic party candidate. either for the president or off year election for the member of the house. and you can see on the right there the furthest column to the right those are people with no religious affiliation and those with another religious afghanistan which is neither christian or jewish is heavily supporting democrat in the last decade. you is see protestant they haven't won in the last decade either. i wouldn't expect them to have any chance in the election either among the prod accident. the catholic vote is the one that is swinging back and forth. it's the
association of latino elected and appointed officials known as naleo. from tuesday, the is 45 minutes. [inaudible conversations] be mac good morning. we're going to get started with their briefing this morning. the naleo found on election 2012. trenches association of latino elected and appointed officials. virtual organizations. one of the membership of the nation's latino public servants. serving schoolboys, city councils, commissions can the state legislatures it to members of congress and united states senate. the naleo educational fund is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization whose mission is to promote the full participation of latinas in the american political process. that includes encouraging residents become u.s. citizens, all u.s. citizens 18 years of age eligible to vote to be counted in the 2010 census as they did two years ago. we also provide training opportunities for latino elected and appointed officials and promote a policy framework to make sure participation in our electoral democracy is accessible to the teen spirit today will we'd like to do is share with you to
are not a slave state. we should be able to practice our law as we see fit. >>> and number of latino and african-american community leaders warned earlier this week that the republican party will become marginalized if it continues to ignore issues that are important to minority voters. this happened at the african american civil war museum here in washington. speakers including national council black women president faye williams, author lenny mcallister discuss the vote to suppress through voter i.d. laws popping up around the country. on the eve of the first presidential debate of 2012, our focus will be timely and important, and that is to discuss and highlight the impact of minorities and women on the 2012 presidential and legislative elections. tonight's inaugural event is being held before the first presidential debate between president barack obama and governor mitt romney. tonight's town hall meeting provides us with a unique and strategic opportunity to put our important and crucial minority vote front and center because this is about us, our families, our communities. it's about our f
was held in washington tuesday by the national association of latino elected and appointed officials also known as naleo. this is about 45 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. we're going to get, we're going to get started with our briefing this morning. the presentation on election 201 by the naleo fund, the national association of latino elected and appointed officials. we're two organizations, one is a membership organization of ofe nation's latino public servants serving county commissions, state legislatures all the way up to members of congress and the united states senate. the naleo educational fund is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, nonpartisan organization whose mission is to promote the full participation of latinos in the american political process. that includes encouraging legal permanent residents to become u.s. citizens, encouraging all u.s. citizens 18 and older who are eligible to vote, we also provide training opportunities for latino elected and appointed officials, and we promote a policy framework to make sure that participation in our electoral democracy is acc
brother's district he dropped it from 45% latino down to 31% latino, his brother would be safe and wouldn't face a challenge in the democratic primary by a latino candidate. another thing he did is got democrats and republicans together to pursue incumbent power so in other words sometimes we see these gerrymanders meaning one part is trying to pick up as many seats as possible, in california in that particular year basically the democrats get together with the republicans and they said let's not push for party gains but preserve our own seat and focus on incumbent gerrymandering and draw districts that benefit us so we are not challenged. that's burma. >> what role to the computers play in the current election system? is it good or not so good? >> computers are a tool so i think they can be great and they can also cause problems. with people like michael berman they can do more than ever. they have much more data, they can map things much more easily before people used to guess and estimate about the census and where people lived and taking the data from the list and putting it on a map
in northeast los angeles. it was predominantly a latino community. >> mostly illegal? >> i think it was a combination. there were a lot of immigrant families, but you know there were also legal and illegal family's. >> how did illegals view the illegals? >> i am not so sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shy when i got to school. most of the kids in my classroom or dark-skinned and they look just like me and they had lost names like rcn gonzalez and hernandez and they could speak a language that i could not speak. that was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and yet they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of of the fact that there were a latino's, but they were different from me. >> you were in the esl classes, english as a second language classes? >> yes. >> was that a second class citizen type thing? >> yeah, definitely. being an esl student, that is who you are and that is the way people treat you, like an
los angeles. it was predominately latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination. yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but they're also legal legal and illegal families. >> host: out of the legal dispute the ev goes? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school at that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skinned than that of the show slake me and they had last names like garcia and gonzalez and fernandez and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. and i was really shocking to me because they looked exactly like me and get newer. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: viewer in esl classes come english as a second language classes? was that -- was not a second-class class citizen type thing? >> guest: yeah, definitely. being an esl student is who you are and that way pe
. it particularly left of african-americans and latinos who were actually excluded from those programs or the programs despite lobbying by the liberals in the day and the naacp, the programs didn't prohibit discrimination. we know some of the suburbs we went to to have our golden age had covenants, so a lot of white people don't remember the extent to which the government helped them rise. my irish catholic family rose from desperate poverty to the middle class and literally one generation, but you've got this divide where a lot of people don't realize that they got help then you have african-americans and latinos pointing to the help they got and this terrible communication gap. how can you say you didn't get something that i didn't even know you got. that's a big problem i want the book to start to talk about. the other thing we don't think about enough and the first meaning of the title is the extent to which we all -- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am
of all of the latino children are uninsured. all of the families, said it is a big win for us and the same for the african-american community, but it wasn't just for a specific community. i think that he shied away from those issues which is like for us we didn't get immigration reform done. >> final comment from hector. >> i just want to say talking about the most moving and humbling moment in life is when i was on the march where i had the [inaudible] where dr. king spoke almost 50 years ago. there was unique. but some of the comanches were marching with the african-american children singing together in the symbolism of coming together almost 50 years to fight for the same issue for the right to vote but also on the workers' rights and education is very important, and we need to keep focus on that level of unity because together we can for 30% of the piatt to become pie as we need to work together understanding each community with high priorities that reflect the interest of the common working class. >> i don't want 30% of the pie. i want at least 50. all right, folks, give
: in highland park in northeast los angeles, and it was predominantly a latino community. >> host: mostly illegal? >> guest: i think it was a combination, yeah, there were a lot of immigrant families, but, you know, there were also the legal and illegal families. >> host: how did the legals view the illegals? >> guest: i'm not too sure about that because as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults, but what i do remember the most is being shocked when i got to school that most of the kids in my classroom were dark skin, and they looked just like me and had names like garcia and hernandez, and they could speak a language i couldn't speak. that was shocking to me because they looked exactly like me, and, yet, they weren't. i would say that was probably the first time i was really aware of the fact that they were latinos, but they were different from me. >> host: you were in esl classes? english as a second language classes? >> guest: yeah. >> host: was that a second class citizen type thing? being in that class? >> guest: definitely, being an esl stude
growing latino population which is about one-third of all catholics. in 2008, a majority of white catholics voted for john mccain but two-thirds of latino catholics voted for barack obama. republicans have strong support among those catholics who attend religious services often democrats have strong support among the so-called nominal or cultural catholic. indeed in 2008 john mccain won 51% of weekly church attending catholics, obama's catholic majority was anchored by the strong support from 0 nation -- occasional and non-church attending catholics. for the 2012 election, it is likely that the divide between the observe end and the nominal catholics will grow as president obama's policy on contraception, u.s. aid for international family planning organizations, and other social issues have driven a deep wedge within the catholic community. mitt romney appeals to white church going catholics bots of -- because of the social conservative view. the religious identity for them appears simply does not matter. a new survey being released tomorrow suggests that a key to the outcome of t
conversations among the students and that the african-american kids and the latino kids who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is it just has overwhelming compelling educational benefits. that's it. that is the university of texas is are doing. that is the exception to the principal of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized to. i think that is ridiculous. and indeed there are social scientists of their. increasingly these educational benefits, which, you know me get only a marginal and provide to education are disputed it's important for the court to bear in mind, and the court jurisprudence is moving this way that even if there are some educational benefits the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination something is compelling and if an interest is compelling and, you got to consider the inherent liabilities and the racial discrimination that involves to crime. what are some of the costs of racial discrimination and the university missions? why should notice by heart but i don't and this is
-age children, the westminster school had 628 anglo students and just 14 of latino heritage while the hoover school had 152 students,al of them latino. -- all of them latino. the suit was filed pre-brown, and thus in an era where the supreme court continued to sanction separate but equal schools. nevertheless, a district judge in los angeles struck down the mexican schools on the argument that they did violate the equal protection clause, and he was upheld on much narrower grounds by the ninth circuit. that could have ended the matter, but the ninth circuit's ruling did not force the state to address other aspects of discrimination in its schools. and as a result, if it had settled there, the state education code would still have included language that permitted separate schools for chinese and other asian students. instead, in june of 1947, warren signed the legislation that struck that language and ended all formal racial segregation in california schools. so the warren who managed the warren court, who came to the court in '53 knew racism in schools and most importantly, i think, in the c
for joining us, we stand adjourned. [applause] ♪ >> today an examination of voting laws and latino voters hosted by the national association of latino elected and appointed officials. it's live at 10 a.m. eastern here on c-span2. and later a look at how the 2012 campaign is being covered. judy woodruff of pbs' "newshour", gwen ifill of washington week, and candy crowley of cnn's "state of the union" talk about the race. that's live at 7:30 p.m. eastern also here on c-span2. >> it's time now for our lightning round. we're going to ask questions that can only be answered with the word yes or no by the candidates. we're going to ask both candidates to refrain from explanations or maybes or anything except a yes or no. >> um, senator, would you like -- sorry, we're going to be starting with you, ms. long, forgive me. would you like to be senate majority leader, if elected? >> would i like to be senate majority leader? sure. [laughter] >> senator? >> yes. >> ms. long, have you fired a gun or rifle within the last year? >> yes. >> senator? >> no. >> ms. long, is andrew cuomo the best new york g
% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point margin becomes you know, six or five or four? sort of taking turnout down among these two groups? just by necessity this was going to be a lot closer. >> look in 2008, the president had to win this back. a seven-point margin for a democrat is big. that is a historic margin for a democrat. no, think all of us expected this to be a closer race. i think charlie the thing we should look for it now with early voting, we h
conversations among students and that the african-american kids and latino kids who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is -- just as overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. i think that is ridiculous. and indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say it is true, it really happens. increasingly these educational benefits which made only marginal improvement to education are disputed. it is increasingly disputed that there are educational benefits but it is also important for the court to bear in mind and the court's jurisprudence -- even if there are educational benefits, they have got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling, you got to consider the inherent liabilities in racial discrimination that it involved too, right? what are the costs of racial discr
shifts but we are in the same boat now. final analysis, it doesn't matter we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether we are a democrat or republican. it doesn't matter whether we are straight or gay. it doesn't matter whether we are jewish or muslim or christians. we are one people, one family, one house. [applause] this book "across that bridge" in effect our struggle is not a struggle to redeem the soul of america. it's not a struggle that lasts one day, one week, one month or one lifetime. maybe you would take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union, to create the beloved community. and you heard david tell you why did get a rest at few times, and young people, young children say how can you be in the congress if you got arrested? [laughter] you violated the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today
to congressman steve king first. >> according to this day datacenter of iowa latinos make up 5 percent of the state's population. the fourth district have latino populations of more than 10%. five other counties, including here, a population of more than 5%. congressman king, what is your plan to deal with illegal immigration while still making i a lot of warm and welcoming place for new immigrants? .. first of all, we need to remember that we are all god's children created in his image. there has to be dignity provided for all human beings, but the united states of america like any other nation, if we're going to be a nation, we have to have a border. if you don't protect the border and decided comes and goes, you're not a nation of all. at the center of this is the rule of law. the rule of law is one of the essential pillars of american exceptional as an. i stood clearly on that issue. most of the laws that we need out there, and i would add one more to it. it is called a new idea act is, and it is the new. the acronym stands for a illegal deductions act. breezy iras into the enforce
latino book award. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. as we enter these last few months, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove. he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. here in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground state. he has become king of the super pacs. $1.8 billion. to put that into perspective, in 2008, mccain had 375 million to spend. this is a factor of five. you're going to start seeing it come out now. the other thing that i wanted to discuss his who is he, what does he do? he is a political operative. well, how does he operate? what does he do? and i talked to a couple of sources about that. one, who is one of the victims, said that there is a dark and terrible beauty about what he does. and i had another was a former cia agent who told me that you know, the cia could learn a lot from karl rove. in the way that he has deniability and all these operations that he does, he is very visible, he is something like 70% of name recognit
have your experience dealing with the latino women of los angeles, your thoughts? >> guest: my thoughts are that this is a big country, and there's room for everybody, and i also think on a very personal level that we are on this earth to celebrate diversity, not to hate each other, but to respect each other. >> host: uh-huh. you feature in "the invisible wounds of war," the poems of brian turner. explain who he is. >> guest: brian turner. he comes from a military family, and as we know of families whether you're a police family or a fireman or professor or -- he decided to join the army. and he was majoring in literature in college and thinking about writing. and he went to iraq, and he had a totally -- he refers to himself as a witness. and he wrote two wonderful books of poems, one called "hear bullet," and the other is "phantom noise" which was about his experience in the war. they both won awards. i saw them in a magazine, i thought, i have to get to know this man. so we spoke on the phone. i did interview him. i got permission to use his poems. i thought it would be very interesti
. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves, historian winecheck friends the findings of recent archaeological work at jefferson's estate, monticello, and a science writer writes about the search for earth's twin. look for these titles in the coming week. >> 50 years ago, president job john f. kennedy was in the midst of the cuban missle crisis. >> george ball, johnson, george bundy. >> it's the 50th anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. with historyian, scholars, film
with latino women of los angeles, what are your thoughts? >> guest: my thoughts are this is a big country and there is room for everybody. i also think on a personal level we're on this earth to celebrate diversity, not to hate each other but to respect each other. >> host: you feature in the invisible wounds of war, the poems of brian turner. explain who he is. >> guest: brian turner, he comes from a military family and as in all families whether it is a police family or a fireman or a professor, he decided to join the army, and, he was majoring in literature in college. and thinking about writing. and. he went to iraq. he had a totally, he refers to himself as a witness. he wrote two wonderful books of poems, one called, here bullet, and another, phantom noise. it was about his experience in the war. they both won awards. they both had a magazine. we spoke on the phone. i have did interview him. i got permission to use his poems. i thought it would be very interesting to see about a soldier who is writing about what happens. even more important about brian turner, in his second book, "a
into her story of civic engagement and getting people involved particularly young people and the latino community. folks often said alex will only win if young people, to vote and only win because he can speak spanish but again i won the election because we got average white middle-class votes in the community who got out and voted for me. that is just a real practical look plan can do is look at who is registered to vote. we spend time trying to expand the voter pool and we have to focus on the voters who we know are going to get out on election day to actually vote. >> there is a neighborhood in a college town and it is called that because it's 97% students and college students everywhere. it ended up 35 people voted of those 3000, so you know we targeted them more than any other race. >> it great conversation already and we need to add one more voice to it. >> that is a tough act to follow certainly but i want to thank the mayor's and the berkeley center for giving me the opportunity to be here. a funny story i would say, we were sent an e-mail saying bears a series of events and sai
in essays, and they can benefit students who are not poor orla -- or latino or black. there were black and latino students who are higher academic grades and not admitted in the same class in which she was denied admissions. i think the tough thing is that there's a larger pool of students who are qualified for admissions than can be offered admissions to every university so invariably, people are upset when they are not admitted, but it's not because race is considered # among the 12 things that are considered. >> host: mr. taylor? >> guest: i noticed earlier, towards a possible area of consensus, it's a sensitive topic for a long time, but if you seen some of the transparency idea we argued for in the brief and the book, we don't argue affirmative action, but a major remedy is make public how the system works. it's now very secret, very secret. no university voluntarily makes public how much weight it gives to race nor how well the people who are admitted with lower scores how well they do. if i was coming in from high school now, i'd want to know that sort of information before i de
senate he's going to vote against it again. the latino families in the state and in this country deserve to have that dream act passed. deserve comprehension immigration reform, you crack down on employers that knowingly hire undocumented workers, and then you give people an opportunity to get to the back of the line and have some sort of legal status when they get to the front. and the old arizona law which is paper, please, that's a terrible discriminatory law. my opponent wants to bring it to nevada. heller: i say we agree and 80% of clinically the 20% we didn't agree. amnesty. that's what she supports at the end of the day. if you put a blanket amnesty down on the floor of the house of representatives, she would support. let's step back for just a moment. people come in -- the hispanic so, to my office, they are concerned about the dream act and the concerned about other things. they're concerned about their families, jobs. they're concerned about the education for the kids. these are the issues we have to solve unsolved for the hispanic community. they are unemployment again is half
population is latino, puerto rican and a diversity as well. so i got elected last november. there were four of us running in the election. it was a nonpartisan race on the local level so the top two vote getters went against each other in november. i won with 53% of the vote and i became mayor in january at the age of 22. and then i turned 23 and i will be 24 and january so i'm quickly getting up there. [laughter] it is a very stressful job at all so very very rewarding. there is nothing more special than being a mayor and a town or city that you're born and where your family still lives in your friends are there in the schools that you want who are still there and your teachers or if still teaching in the public schools. given my age are current our current school superintendent for example is my principal of the high school so it's been a really reporting experience and we are focused on four different issues in particular and that is education. we have a 53% graduation rate over four years so a lot of large urban centers around the country we do have challenges around education and our g
% of latinos. romney has to have more than 60% of white men and this is where they are concentrating on these little tiny pieces right now that they are greeted try to move around and not get rattled. i can't place and if emphasis on early voting. the obama campaign takes the early voting so seriously. they hit the ground game that is totally devoted to this connect campaign manager says the idea is no r-ks. >> finish line, not where you start three >> if mitt romney loses a key figure going to look at why they didn't unveil the mitt romney that they saw in debate number one because that is a much different candidate. >> my guess is they had some focus groups that fought he looked too aggressive. >> you didn't need a focus group to tell you that. >> welcome i don't know. i think that they wheeled him in, don't you come seriously? he was so -- you said that in the beginning could he follow instructions because he had to kind of tone down a little bit. >> when he said you're probably right, that is proof of what he was saying. >> quick representing the obama campaign, we wrap up the sh
, barack obama is ahead with latinos but the crush in the poll was their enthusiasm was less than 2008 so i think that is another aspect of last night. >> glen, you know my thinking has been while it was mathematically possible for romney to get the 270 electoral votes without ohio, michigan, pennsylvania, that was like a three or four cushion shot pool. is ohio really what we should be looking at more out more than anything else? >> that is a really good question charlie because yes, certainly much easier for mitt romney to win the presidency if he wins ohio. there is a reason no republican has ever won the presidency without winning ohio. i entered this election cycle believing that there were now three key states and instead of just florida and ohio and i would add virginia to that list and kind if of you know key states. if they are at the top, the next half level down is north carolina. but, look, clearly governor romney is stronger in florida and virginia. those are very competitive states right now. ohioan someplace where
% employment -- unemployment rate. about 50% of our population is latino mostly puerto rican descent and a diversity as well. so i got elected last november. there were four of us running in the election. and nonpartisan race on the local level so the top vote getters faced off against each other in november. i won with 53% of the vote and i became mayor in january at the age of 22. then i turned 23 and i will be 24 and january so i'm quickly getting up there. [laughter] is a very stressful job but also very very rewarding. there is nothing more special than being a mayor in a city that you were born and where your family still lives in your friends are there and the school that you want to is distill their and your teachers are oftentimes still teaching the public schools. given my age -- it's been a rewarding experience and we are forecast on four different issues in particular, that is education. with a 53% graduation rate over four years so a lot of urban centers around the country. we do have challenges around education and their graduation rate. economic development like i said
of thing. and republicans backing away from the latino community is divided down the strategy is any political party is ever a doubt it. >> i couldn't agree more. >> the skins in his own party were drowned them out. >> i don't believe they would. he's going to go to the convention. >> the were so do is if he will stay at home. >> can you receive the public convention no matter what he says on immigration? what is the downside? in terms of the general election, the people opposed to immigration are to vote for barack obama anyways. there's just no downside. the same thing is true for barack obama. both guys have 45% of the vote. they do. so you really arguing 10% or 15% last. and those people aren't ideologues. they have freelancers and they listen and that is what all of the attention should be. and i think a lot of people, all these packs, and spending, most of these people are wasting their money. there's so many ads in the swing states, everybody tunes out. you just can't pay attention. and it's spoken after slogan and eventually you're mine doles to the whole thing. >> on this hi
mention. the diversification of our group in brazil we saw 26%. and mexico 12, another latino country 6%. that is all for% in the emerging market. we have roughly speaking half of our earnings. the rest diversified in countries such as the u.s., u.k. or germany. that means diversification is their kiosk pectin understanding under the resilience against the crisis. the fact of having a decentralized city area, means that if any crisis were to happen in one of the markets in which we are, we are able to have a firewall around this element of christ is, affecting by the investment in those countries but that the spillover impact. when we present to the bank of spain, we underline the bank of spain, as one of the great bear. they standalone independent said series. with the fact of having the banking operation with the largest branch of the world give us access to stable liquidity dependent on financial market. we find ourselves basically the banking obligation, another interesting feature. to the extent, it is likely about 100% of 170%, which is practically funding our assets and with a ve
. [cheering and applause] the european, african-american, asian, latino, everybody near as i could tell, the only thing they had in common the wide array of extremely impressive tattoos. these people get what they're doing. they know they're making america energy dependent. they are -- fighting global warming. they are liberating you from the independence and nevada and california and eventually all america can be self-sufficient and environmentally responsible and create more jobs. and -- [cheering and applause] the president opened new federal land for responsible gas and oil development. he's not against that. he wants us to do all the above. how can we not go after solar and wind power when every ncial study said -- in the capacity to generate electricity from the sun and wind. how can we turn away from the fact germany on a country -- in london -- on a sunny day last spring generated the equivalent of 20 nuclear power plants worth of electricity from the sun alone. [cheering and applause] why in the world would we walk away from that future? the answer is follow the money. follow t
to romney have an advantage now. you start to see democrats, african-americans, latinos get excited after tonight's debate. >> the debate opened on a very fast pace. martha raddatz was not going to be jim lehrer and they started with an obvious vulnerability for the administration, which is benghazi. they had a very sharp exchange. and then not, one of ryan's soundbites of the night came out, which was the foreign policy is unraveling. i think where the clip of that exchange. flesh academy can talk about it. >> is this a massive intelligence failure, vice president i? >> it was a tragedy, martha appeared chris stevens was one of the best. i can make two commitments to you. one, we will find and bring to justice the men who did this. and secondly, we will get to the bottom of it. wherever the facts lead us, we'll make clear to the american public. whatever mistakes i made will not be made again. when you look in president, martha, it seems to me should look at his most important responsibility. that is caring for the national security of the country in the best ways to look at how he handl
or entirely latino school who becomes class president would get some points because he has or she has proven that they foster or can deal in a diverse environment. that's understood the plan, that it's not just giving you a plus because of race. it is combining that with other factors. >> there is a plus because of race. many factors in the decision. might i say that the white student president of the class in a different school is a measure of leadership. leadership is an independent factor in the pai. he's not getting a point because of his race. he's getting that because of his leadership. but his recent tour criteria to argue for anyone. it is an independent add-on, something they can use to boost a pai score or element in any way they like as they contextualize it. is that it's not necessarily, not narrowly tailored. it ignores alternatives and gives disparate treatment to asian-americans because they are minorities as well enter the extent it depends on the classroom factor, there's simply no way to relate or fit what they are doing to the solution of the problem, which they use as a m
people do. goes to an entirely black or latino school who becomes vice president she has proven that they foster [inaudible] and that is how i understood their plan. but it is not just giving you a plus because of race. it is combining that with other factors to leadership. >> leadership is an independent actor. he's getting that because of his independent leadership. race is an independent add-on, it can be used to boost the pai for the pas element. it gives disparate treatment to asian-americans and to the extent, depends on the classroom factor. there is simply no way to relate what they are doing to the solution of the problem, which they used as a major foundation of their proposal, which is the non-diverse clasroom. certainly there is no correspondents there in a few in my time as a for two overriding reasons, they are holding this court is approved and the harvard plan. >> i had put that in the category, it is now clear the way that he says. in achieving an interest that is compelling. the universities interest in assembling a broadly diverse body. >> what exactly do thes
debate, he was trying to be more palatable to latino voters who see an anti-illegal immigrant stance as being one hostile to hispanic people. but it was mostly, it was aimed precisely at asians. .. this population is coming very, very fast. it's something republicans have to deal with going forward, but they still at least have a translation problem. the african-american population is a very slow growing population and that will affect elections going forward. henry? >> first the long white vote is crucial. he's going to lose the white vote. the question is the size of the margin. every mom white voter particularly hispanic or african-american is 80 to 85% likely to be a vote for him. that said, and ohio this is literally a black-and-white state there is no appreciable non-hispanic or asian population anywhere in ohio. early voting is exclusively focused on the african-american community. it said among non-whites which they had a 24% of the electorate president obama was carrying 79% which is what he did four years ago which was 95, 95% ahead of african-americans running ahead with h
with. let me say, look, i don't want anybody mistreated. i think our hispanic and latino friends are terrific people. we have to come up with solutions here. i believe romney will do that as president, i'm going help him. i'm in a position to the committee and on want finance committee. >> moderator: a rebuttal? howell: i wish you would help president obama inspect is the essence of the problem. he's only going to help president romney. ladies and gentlemen, this is what the problem is back there. we have become so isolated. i'm going work with governor romney who become president or president obama. we have to make sure that we tackle the problem. for 36 years my opponent has been back there, we haven't had an solution. in ibm in the position you don't fix the problem, you are terminated. >> moderator: go to the next question the ceo of the farm bureau. it will go to mr. howell. >> senator hatch, mr. -- howell good to be here. a burden for the financial well being what do you propose to do to reduce government spending, cut the debt and secure our national security for the futur
, it being a midterm year, a lot of latino voters stayed home, and there was a big tea party movements in the corpus area, and he won after a runoff by about 800 or 900 votes. >> cb solomon of -- solomon ortiz senior. >> that's exactly right. yes. but he arrived because first he was inexperienced in the ways of governance or politics at large. he arrives three and half weeks after everybody else did because of the recount, and so i followed a lot of these congressman around to get a sense of the irrational experience, and his was one of the kind of citizen politicians to try as you might can never quite catch up. always just sort of, you know, holding on to the medicine ball for dear life and never kind of getting a top of it. he was -- i mean, he told me he had this recurring nightmare that he was alone in his office and there was no furniture and only a phone that rang and rang and rang and he was never able to get it. he told a group of business lobbyists. you know you have that anxiety. dreams are really big. you know, that anxiety dream of going to school and looking down and not
school where became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an er doctor at eisenhower medical center. i am living proof that the american dream. but for too many people, the american dream is endangered because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their saving and too many students can't afford college. and congress and our congress on have lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they are focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points of looking out for themselves and wealthy donors. congresswoman bono mack's response is more at the same. more bickering, more partisanship. and were looking out for yourself instead of us. instead of listening to people in proposing world solution, the congresswoman replies on the same partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or fixed income. watch tonight how many times you pass around empty phrases like liberal and big governments and nancy pelosi. every time you hear them, remind yourself, this is a lang
so many new jerseyans and immigrants and the latino community disproportionately affected, work for these businesses that will be affected. one out of six americans work in the private sector, work for a small business, so we can't let these tax rates go up and you talk about access to capital. you know we overregulate the banks. we had some problems on wall street obviously and these guys passed a big massive regulatory bill that now ensures that businesses cannot get their loans. they can't meet their payroll. people want to go and refinance her house and they can't do it. and so, communities, all communities are holding their breath that we can do something differently. these guys haven't passed a budget in three years so why should we be surprised that they haven't done anything about the fiscal cliff that is coming? and a shortage of capital in and the access to capital. menendez: i didn't hear an answer to your question so let me try. first there will be no tax increases on new jerseyans or americans in january because we will not allow the fiscal cliff to ultimately have
it was attacks on veterans to speak about their military service or whether it is his discussions of latinos being dependent on government the way african-americans are or his attack on the president. i am proud of my military service ended as part of who i am and it's how i conduct myself. i've i have served my nation honorably. the real heroes are the men who saved me and every day i get up and work every day to serve my nation because i've had to make sure that i make the most of the second chapter of the life i have and carry myself with the responsibility. the military is about the mission. it's about getting the job done and making sure we come together and this hyperpartisan vitriol that comes out, and my opponent is known for that. in fact the "chicago tribune" when they endorse me said he is a hyperpartisan make a mouth. we don't need that in washington. walsh: at the beginning of every town hall to recognize those who have served and i've called them heroes because they are and i have called ms. duckworth a hero. the point i voiced it to make is this great country struggling right
about the military service or whether it is his discussions of latinos or his attacks on the president. i am proud of my military service. its product line and and that's how i conduct myself to it i served my nation honorably. i've never called myself a hero and everyday i get up and i work every day to serve my nation because i have that to live up to. i have to make sure that i make the most of the second chance of life that i have and carry with the responsibility. it's up the mission, it's about getting the job done and making sure that you come together and decide for partisan vitriol that comes out, and my opponent is known for that and at "the chicago tribune" said he's a hyper partisan mega mouth. we don't need that in washington. >> moderator: me at the beginning of every town hall that i've had for two and a half years i recognize those that have served and i have called them hero's. the point that i've always tried to make is this great country is struggling right now. to run for congress you need to tell the voters what you believe and where you stand on issues and not jus
. churches volunteered in small towns to be sort of the mentors for these families. when many of our latino families came to the meatpacking plants there was no such buffer. at state level when tom was governor we created iowa centers that helped with all the issues an transition issues to fill the buffer. i think that is really interesting idea. i don't know exactly how you would move it forward but i think it is certainly an interesting thing to contemplate. >> moderator: go ahead. >> one more question on immigration, mr. king, yes or no are you planning to sue, in june you announced you wanted to sue president obama over change in policy that younger people would not be deported for a period of time. are you still planning that lawsuit? >> i believe that the president has violated the constitution just like tom vilsack did when he thought he could legislate by executive order. this president can not legislate by executive edict or memorandum. i intend to follow through on that. i ran into a few barriers because of the election. it was bogging people down. so the answer is yes. >> how soo
probably a large turnout. a latino vote that will end up 75 to 25. we have different country. that's part of the racial mix. i think we have time for one more. >> i have something to say about that. i have something to say about everything. [laughter] i'm sorry i know i blab teach. how much time left? five minutes. [inaudible] they can ask you questions when they buy your book. that's right. you can do that. i brought a pen and i'm from kansas, i'm allowed to say that. i brought a pen and i will be signing bocks later. interesting thing. we can see the demographic change in the country are going toward the democrat when you talk to them in d.c. they are so what if we lose or that. we lost the election, you know, and there's, you know, conservative are doing the things. who cares, frank, they say. who cares. the future is ours. democrat will win the election in of the future. the republicans will no doubt twinned things won't stay the same. republicans aren't stupid. and they, you know, they can see what's happening as well as. did you second of all, the power of money. it's the one thing
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